Negotiamini Media
Truth is Powerful

Why my ancestral home could be lost to climate change

15

As Bangladesh celebrates 50 years of independence, Qasa Alom reflects on how the country his British-Bangladeshi family still calls home is being affected by climate change.

“Can you turn the air-con on?” I asked over and over but none of the grown-ups seemingly could hear me. “It’s so hot!”

My mum shot me a look that suggested I would have more than the heat to worry about if I carried on moaning.

We had come to Bangladesh, the country of my ancestors, to see my grandparents, visit our village and, as I was constantly reminded, to “learn about my roots”. As a child, I had spent my holidays roaming our lands – exploring the rice paddies with my younger brother, watching the farm hands tend to the cows and fishing in one of several fushkunis, or small lakes. It was a giant playground, full of joy, wonder and mischief.

But, that magic had started to wear off as a teen.

One thing I remember vividly about that trip was the moment we were all told to get out of the car that was taking us from the airport to our village.The road in front of us was completely under water. We were only […]

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